Tuesday, April 15, 2014

On The Origin of Species

Let us reexamine that profoundly fascinating question of old, shall we?

Which came first, the chicken or the egg?"

Did the primordial goo spring up into a chicken, or did it spring up into separate specimens (for every species) of an egg and a sperm that somehow found each other, got all mingled up and incubated in the right way, and lived happily ever after as one little feathery clucker? And how is it that more chickens came after the first - was that first chicken already successfully equipped, without the evolutionary wait, with a functioning reproductive system? How else did successive, evolving numbers of chickens (as well as every other species) appear?

These thoughts sprang to my mind the other day as I pondered the rare treasure of the double-yolked egg. That got me wondering if twins skip a generation in chickens, too, so one of the egg's grandchickens may have been a twin, too. :)

As I've previously mentioned, I have a reading goal this year of st last one book every two weeks. Who better to answer my questions to than Mr. Darwin himself? So, I have downloaded  On the Origin of Species  on my Kindle and plan to make it my next read.

2 comments:

  1. I have Darwin's book in my shelf. Bought it on sale many years ago. Evolution is a very slow process. If you want to study it, you need to study fossils, or islands that have been isolated for å long time, such as Galapagos. An intetrsting aspect are the mass extinctions (end of Permian, end of Cretaceous), when most species extinct, leaving space for new species to develop >:)

    Cold As Heaven

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  2. I loved On The Origins of Species.
    I am looking forward to hearing what you thought of it.

    --
    Timothy S. Brannan
    The Other Side, April Blog Challenge: The A to Z of Witches

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