Friday, October 10, 2014

7QT - Thrift Shop Icon Eggs and Solitaire-y Ne'er-Do-Wells.



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Over the last few weeks I have been reading the two-book series of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. (I took a break this past week because I needed to focus on midterms.) But the books were inspired by old photographs found in bins at thrift stores and flea markets...you've probably seen them. I thought it was a great idea!! So today I went to a thrift store and finally found some here in town (I found some in the town I previously lived in, too, but these are the first I've come across here.) I found a few gems. I'll show you below!
 

This is the one I found the most striking.
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I also found the following two intriguing.
 


What are they hiding behind their backs...?
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And this one here?? Yeah. It looks all normal and everything....
 


But turn it around, and...
..."sort of a druggist" [druggist?]. Hmm.
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The thrift store I went to was a new one to me, and I thought it was kind-of cool. They also had figurines of this Nigerian Santa:
 

 
And this obviously Pentecostal angel:
 
 
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And this. I thought this was really cool and bought it. It is a wooden egg about the size of my hand. Are icons on wooden eggs a thing?
 


 
 
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I tend to spend a little some an inordinate amount of time playing two-suit spider solitaire. I noticed the cards the other day...
Little Mister King looks angry. The Queen in turn looks worried.
And that ne'er-do-well Jack is just turning a blind eye, as usual....
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Hope everyone has a great weekend!!
 
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Sunday, October 5, 2014

Late Ottoman Discussion Contrasting Science and Religion

Occaaaaasionally (read: often), I stalk my professors online...not so much in a scary way as to see where/what they studied, what they have written, etc. This semester I found some papers by one of my professors via Academia.edu. One of the papers caught my attention as being right up my alley. It was an analysis of a debate between two Arabic intellectuals in the late Ottoman period, concerning whether science or religion was more likely to yield truth.

Note: I did not read the debate myself; I only read my professor's analysis. For the more in-depth and knowledgeable analysis of the debate, read his paper (linked above). Here, I will summarize the debate as he presented it and discuss it in my own way.

The debate took place between Celal Nuri and Sehbenderzade Ahmed Hilmi in 1913. Nuri, a prominent public intellectual, posited (through a whole book!) that nothing metaphysical exists, so any philosophy not founded on scientific revelation is basically nothing more than an abstract logical exercise and ultimately meaningless (though perhaps useful as a social construct). Hilmi responded to Nuri's book and reasoned that since science works with hypotheses and theories, perpetually revising them according to new discoveries, it is in fact false to refer to scientific exploration as truth.

I am using my own words here to summarize what my professor summarized (O.o), but it seemed to Hilmi that science is almost equivocal to religion (in a philosophical way) in that both are avenues along which people walk with an intention to find the truth (and in this way, both deal with metaphysical subjects). Neither is truth itself, but more of a direction or path along which to potentially reach the truth. It seems to me that he also indicated, though, that metaphysical religion and materialistic science can neither one be based upon the other, because they by nature are wholly different.

...I don't think I have a whole lot to add to these ideas at the moment, but I found the debate intriguing and wanted to mention it here. As always, interactions are welcome! :)